Recommended Trees

The Urban Forestry Council annually reviews and updates this list of trees, in collaboration with public and non-profit urban forestry stakeholders, including San Francisco’s Department of Public Works Urban Forestry Division and Friends of the Urban Forest.

Caring For Your New Street Tree

Proper establishment of your street tree is critical to the future health and maintenance requirements of your tree.  See below for the essentials for a healthy establishment period, which will result in a long and happy life for your tree. A good investment of time now will save you maintenance dollars in the future.

 

Here are the basics

Urban Forest Plan

Our urban forest is a complex system of trees, plants, wildlife, soil, air and water within the city including the many people who care for and enjoy it.

The Urban Forest Plan’s first phase – Street Trees – is now available.

 

Tree Pruning

Pruning can either help or hurt trees. When appropriate practices are used, pruning can provide significant benefits. When inappropriate practices are used, significant harm can follow. For the long-term health and structural stability of trees in San Francisco, it is critical that pruning practices conform to professional standards. The City and County of San Francisco adopted pruning standards that must be adhered to.

Recommended Plant Lists

The Urban Forestry Council annually reviews and updates this list of trees, in collaboration with public and non-profit urban forestry stakeholders, including San Francisco’s Department of Public Works Urban Forestry Division and Friends of the Urban Forest.

Approved Street Tree List

The Urban Forestry Council annually reviews and updates this list of trees, in collaboration with public and non-profit urban forestry stakeholders, including San Francisco’s Department of Public Works Urban Forestry Division and Friends of the Urban Forest.

Pine Pitch Canker Recommendations

In an effort to identify potential public safety risks posed by diseased Pine trees, Public Works and the City’s Urban Forestry Council are asking property owners to inspect the condition of pine trees within their property or on their sidewalks that appear dead or whose branch tips in the upper crown of the tree begin to die, the first sign of a regional fungal disease.

Significant and Landmark Trees

In 2007, The Urban Forestry Ordinance of the Public Works Code was revised by the Board of Supervisors to protect certain trees on private property that are close to the public right-of-way.

Significant trees are within 10 feet of the public right-of-way and also meet one of the following size requirements:

  • 20 feet or greater in height,
  • 15 feet or greater canopy width, or
  • 12 inches or greater diameter of trunk measured at 4.5 feet above grade.

 

Pages